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Full text of "Superintendents of the Yellowstone National Park, August 1965"



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
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http://archive.org/details/superintendentso00uns_dk7 




IN REPLY REFER TO: 

A2615 
WEATHER 



TRAVEL 



Single Day 
Record 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 83020 

September 10, 1965 

Summary of August 1965 Monthly Narrative Report 

Precipitation above normal. Intermittent 
thunder showers. Heavy frost last 4 days 
2" snow 8/29-30 
Maximum 97° NE 8/10; Min. 18° Tower Fall 8/29 

700,318 visitors, inc. 14.8% over Aug. 1964 
Daily, monthly, seasonal travel new records 
Trailer 109.3% ahead of 1964, pickup campers 30.3% 

Conservation Stickers sold 12,883 — 3,269 sold 
during August 

28,451 visitors 8/4, inc. of 267 over July 4,1964 



P*g£ 



1-2 
2 



SPECIAL VISITOR Mr. Thomas L. Kimball 8/14 



David C. F. Lin, 


8/5 


Taiwan 


Heinrich Kilian, 


9 


Germany 


Fidel Jorge Lopez Aparicio, 


L6 


Spain 


Mr. and Mrs. Marti, 


16 


Chile 


INQUA , 


16 




Count du Pare , 


24 


Belgium 


Count Bruno du Pare, 


24 


Belgium 


Viadyanathaswamy Balaraman ; 


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India 


Nigerian Forestry Students, 


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Akilio 






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Etukudo 







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SPECIAL 

Activities 



50th Anniv. of first auto to enter Yellowstone 
via Cody Entrance 8/1; 

Supt. to YPCo. Emp. Award Dinner 8/18 and 

Counterpart Dinner 8/22; 

Supt. presented National Historic Landmark 

placque for Lolo Trail 8/11 

Asst. Dir.Jenson, WODC Chief Hill in 8/18 



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Biologist Howe to Grand Canyon Aug. 21-24, 

to Bozeman, Mont. Fish & Game, 8/10, 

Mont. Chap. Wildlife Soc. met at Mammoth 8/28-29 

Fisheries Coordinating Committee at Lake 8/18 

NPS auditors in 8/16 

NPS-USFS met 8/19 discuss Smokejumper center 

Good & Harry with Sierra Club; 
Harry with Wilderness Society 

Supt. Staff Meetings 8/12-26 



4-5 



WAGE BOARD 
SURVEY 

PERSONNEL 



Anderson & Miller to Missoula, 8/24-25 

Elliott, Hape promoted 

Appleby reassigned to perm, position 

Gailbreaith sec'y to Chief Park Ranger 

Forsythe, Straiski, Sub j . to Furlough 

McC leery resigned 

Anderson retirement 



Transfers: William B. Foster, Louis L. Gunzel 
Mary T. Shearer, Keith K. Williams 
Detailed: Reeves full time to Regional BRC 
Positions abolished 

BOARD OF SURVEY Destruction of Bldgs. No. 304, 305, 306, 307 



RECREATION / 

CONSERVATION 

Sticker 



Sold to date: 15 YNP employees 
1 WODC " 



6-7 

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OLD MAMMOTH 
HOSPITAL 



DEATHS 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Demolition started week of Aug. 16 

John C. Gynn 8/5 Employee 
James H. Bryant 8/20 Visitor 

Farewell Coffee for Gunzel, Shearer, Williams 
Terry Gillett to Montana Boys State 
Clean-up Campaign 
Yellowstone Park School opened 8/31 



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RESEARCH & 
OBSERVATION 



2 otters trying to catch fish on hook 

One helicopter flight to check bison location 

Neckbands on animals not durable 

4 goslings survive Hot Lake, honkers moved 8/14 

New geyser in lower basin of Potts Hot Springs 
STEAMBOAT erupted Aug. 29 at 12:15 a.m. — 50 days 
since last eruption 

Listed activity for EMERALD POOL - temp, risen to 156 ( 

GREEN SPRING 

CLIFF GEYSER CLEPSYDRA 
THREE SISTERS GRAND 
SPITEFUL GEYSER RIVERSIDE 
LION GEYSER CASTLE 



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INTERPRETIVE 
SERVICES 



YLMA 



EXHIBIT AND 
MUSEUM MAINTE. 



ROADS & TRAILS 



OLD FAITHFUL 355 eruptions 

Max. interval 94 mins. 

Min. interval 36 mins. 

Average 66.4 mins 

Visitor audiences remained relatively large in 
spite of cool and rainy weather 
Interpretive services limited by late Aug. 

Fountain Paint Pot leaflet and Upper Bison 

Trail Guide has had good sale 

Second printing of Big Hole Guide is underway 

O.F. Visitor Center renovation completed 8.6 
Madison & Norris elec. lights installed 
Roadside exhibits cleaned 

Bridge Bay trail approx. 80% complete 

Crushdr crew working in vicinity of North Entrance 

and other detailed work 



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10-11 



BUILDINGS & 
UTILITIES 



SANITATION 



2600 gal. concrete reservoir at Lamar, 
well pump and lines installed at NEE 
Major portions of Mammoth Visitor Center and 
Administration Building completed 
Manholes on reservoirs raised and covered 
Comfort stas. in OF campground repainted 
Sign Shop and Electric Shop interiors painted 
153 signs made, 90% placed 

Some establishments sub-standard 
Follow-up inspections YPCo. and Hamilton's 



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LAW ENFORCEMENT 191 offenses, 50 reported under FBI Uniform Crime Report 12 
6 
INVESTIGATION 126 appearance bonds posted 

23 court hearings 12 

SAFETY & HEALTH 56 motor vehicle accidents; 36 under $100; 

9 more than $100; 11 personal injuries 
Head-on collision involving Govt, employee 8/12, 
Another head-on collision 8/12, total 13 persons hospitalized 



CAMPGROUNDS 

FOREST FIRE 
PROTECTION 

INSECTS & 



Auto accident 8/17, probable attempted suicide 

Filled through August 22 

New lookout in Gallatin NF inspected to determine 
if meets our needs for replacement 



Eradication at W. Thumb completed 8/24 
TREE DISEASES Program approved & work started at Duck Lake 8/26 
Eradication work continued Obsidian Cliff area 



WHITE PINE 
BLISTER RUST 

CONCESSIONERS 



WILDLIFE 



BEAR 



Reeves and 5 men to Bryce Canyon, 8/9-16 at request 
of Midwest & Southwest Regions 

Accommodations & Services closed -- listed 
Cabins razed at O.F.Lodge 

Work begun on 165-66 Wildlife Management Plan 

12 Grizzly bear observed around Fawn Pass 
One sow had 4 yearling cubs 

Black bear drove mother grizzly and 2 cubs from 
elk carcasses 



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Bear Statistics and Incidents 
Listed 

ELK General plans for management tentatively agreed 
upon for winter 1965-66 

PUBLICITY Yellowstone Weekly News issued 

CHAPEL USE Services for all faiths held during month 

PUBLIC "AMERICA' aired over KID-TV Aug. 6, showing 

RELATIONS snowmobile trip from West Yellowstone to O.F. 



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CONTRACTS 



BIG HOLE NB 



DESIGN AND 
CONSTRUCTION 



Listed 

5,970 visitors, decrease of 5%% 

Complete renovation of the museum 

Elliott and Carpenter mdde inspection 8/2-3 

Yellowstone National Park - Listed 
Big Hole National Battlefield - Listed 



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Library 




IN REPLY REFER TO: 



A2615 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 83020 
September 10, 1965 



Memorandum 

To: Director 

From: Acting Superintendent, Yellowstone 

Subject: Superintendent's Monthly Narrative R.eport, August 1965 

General 

Weather Conditions , Precipitation was above normal. Thundershowers 
were intermittent throughout the month. Heavy frost occurred in all 
areas the last four days of the month. Two inches of snow fell at 
the Mt. Washburn Lookout the nights of August 29 and 30. 

The maximum high temperature was 97 degrees on August 10 at North 
Entrance; the minimum, 18 degrees on August 29 at Tower Fall. 



North Entrance 

West Yellowstone 

Mammoth 

Tower Fall 

Lamar 

Northeast 



Maximum 

97 degrees 8/10 
90 9 

89 9 

85 12 

84 12 

79 8,9 



2b 
18 
21 
25 



Minimum 



33 degrees 8/29 



Precipitation 



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2.09 inches 


29 


.99 " 


29 


1.85 " 


29 


2.16 ,; 


19 


2.39 " 



Increase or decrease in travel . A total of 700,318 visitors entered 
the Park during August. This is an increase of 90,413, or 14.8 per 
cent over August of 1964. 

Daily, monthly, and total 1965 travel to date have set new all-time 
records. All phases of travel are ahead of 1964, led by trailers 
with 109.3 per cent increase, and pickup campers with 30.3 per cent 
increase. Season's travel is 8.4 per cent ahead of 1964. 

As of August 29, East Entrance was running 16 per cent ahead of 
last year's figures. The latter days of the month, East was running 
near 100 per cent above 1964 travel. With road construction and 
road closures on the East Entrance road, the entire operation has 
had to improvise and work under very difficult conditions. 



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Northeast Entrance travel vu up 7.9 percent over last year to 
August 31. 

North Entrance travel was up 2.1 percent over last year to August 31. 

The season's total of Conservation Stickers sold is 12,883, and 
3,269 of them were sold during August. A daily average of 1,834 
vehicles was processed during July and an average of 1,796 processed 
during the first 20 days of August. 

Single Day Record . A new single day's record was made August 4, 
when 7,903 automobiles or 28,431 people entered the park, this is 
267 more than the 28,184 on July 3, 1965. the high day in 1964 was 
July 24 when 28,134 visitors came to the Park. 

Foreign Visitors . Professor David C. 9. tin, Architect, Taipei, 
Taiwan, was In the Park August 5 through 7, arriving at Yellowstone 
airport. Hs was escorted around the Park and taken on an all day 
hike to Speciman Ridge. lis was very enthusiastic about the Park and 
enjoyed his stay. 

Mr. Heinrich Rilian, Chief of the Organizational and Protocal Office 
of the Bundestag Administration for the German Government, Germany, 
arrived August 9 at Old Faithful Inn for three days. A representa- 
tive from the Management Assistant's office escorted Mr. Killan. He 
enjoyed his visit and was very enthusiastic about the Park. 

Dr. Fidel Jorge Lopez Apariclo, a professor of chemistry and a 
rector at the university of Vailadolid, Vailadolid, Spain, accompanied 
by Mr. Lopez and Department of State escort- interpreter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Marti of Chili, visited Yellowstone August 16-19. They were escorted 
around the Park by Ranger Kinkade. It rained most of the time they 
were in the park but they apparently enjoyed their visit and thanked 
the National park Service for assistance. 

Members of the International Association for Quaternary Research 
(INQUA) on a tour to points of interest in the Park and nearby 
vicinity as part of their field trip in the Northern Rocky Mountains 
spent the nights of August 16 and 17 at Old Faithful Inn. 

Count du Pare of Belgium, Advisor to H. R. H. King Baudouin of Belgium, 
and his son, Count Bruno du Pare, who is a student at Stanford 
university, visited the Park August 20-24. His current tour is as 
a tourist - not official. The Count and his son are both very much 
interested in the National park Service and its function as a 
conservation agency. They visited the Craighead's operation at 
Canyon during their brief visit and spent part of one evening at the 
Trout Creek dump observing grizzlies. 



VELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 






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Mr. Vaidyanathaswamy Balaraman, Director and General Manager, 
Higginbothams (P) Ltd., Madras, India, one of India's leading 
publishers, talked with Superintendent McLaughlin on August 24. 
Park Naturalist Sielaff met Mr. Balaraman at the Yellowstone air* 
port and discussed natural history and historical associations. 

NIGERIAN FORESTRY STUDENTS TRAINING PROGRAM . The National Park 
Service is conducting a special training program requested by the 
International Agricultural Development Service, U. S. Department 
of Agriculture. Four Nigerian forestry students attending various 
American universities, began a special conservation training program 
at Yellowstone on August 23: 

Stanislaus N. Akilo, University of Minnesota 
Godfrey A. Anetoh, Colorado State University 
. Silas D. Tolushe, Colorado State University 
Gabriel D. Etukudo, University of Washington 

These students met with Division Chiefs and received information on 
Management, Protection, Naturalist and Ranger Division services; 
game management and problems, concessions, and operation of Yellow- 
stone National Park. 

They were escorted to the Redrock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in 
Idaho on August 29; a stop was made at Quake Lake. 

On August 30 they departed Yellowstone for other areas via Grand 
Teton National Park. Park Biologist William J. Barmore was assigned 
to accompany them during the remainder of their trip to Bureau of 
Reclamation, Alpine, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Fort Washakie and 
Wind River Indian Reservation, Bureau of Land Management, Worland 
(all in Wyoming) and return to Jackson September 11. 

Conservation Certificates signed by Secretary of the Interior Udall 
and special information packets were received from Washington and 
will be presented to the students at an appropriate ceremony at 
Moose Visitor Center, September 11, prior to their departure for 
their respective universities. 

On August 1 an observance was held at the East Entrance to commemorate 
the 50th Anniversary of the first automobile entering Yellowstone 
through the Cody, Wyoming entrance. The event was sponsored by the 
Cody Club and about 400 attended under ideal weather conditions. 
The Superintendent appeared on the program and made a short talk 
regarding the Park's part in the event of 50 years earlier and related 
it to visitation today and in the future. 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WVOMINH 



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The Superintendent made the principal talk at the Yellowstone park 
Company's Employee Award Sinner at Canyon Lodge on the 18 th with 
360 In attendance and at the Company's Counterpart Dinner on the 
22nd at Old faithful Ism with 100 In attendance, the Counterpart 
Dinner on the 22nd featured the Company's principal officers and 
employees along with their counterparts on the Park Staff, and on 
the work force. Both events ware initiated by the Company's new 
General Manager , Art Baaate, and he plana to continue them as an 
annual event. 

On the 11th the Superintendent presented the Loio trail (Lewis and 
Clark route across the Bltterroot Mountains) Rational Historic 
Landmark Placque to Regional forester Seal Bahm at the Powell Banger 
Station on the Locha River in the Clearwater Rational forest in 
eastern Idaho. About 30 people attended the event and the Superin- 
tendent made a abort presentation talk. 

Assistant Director J.R.K. Jensen end Chief of the western Office of 
Design and Construction* Sanford Bill, were In the Park August IS 
through 21. the Superintendent and members of his Staff accompanied 
Messrs. Jensen and Hill on a round of Inspection of going construction 
work and a review of plans for future programs. 

Biologist Robert £• Howe traveled to Grand Canyon national Park 
August 21*24 to present a program on Park Service wildlife policies 
and management to 40 intake program Park Rangers at the Horace 
Albright training Center. 

Biologist Robert 1. Howe met with District Supervisor LeRoy Ellig, 
Montana flah and Game Department, Boscman, Montana, August 10, to 
discuss cooperative elk management plana for the 1965-66 winter, 
tentative general plans were agreed upon. 

the Montana Chapter of the midlife Society held a field technique 
and business meeting at Mammoth August 23 and 29. there were 22 

present, the following field techniques were demonstrated 
discussed on the 28tht 

1. Power propelled net for catching birds— Montana Pish 
and Game Department 

2. Bear immobilisation and National park Service resource 
studies— Colorado State university bear investigators 

Park Management Biologiat Bowe 

3. Elk neckbands— Park Management Biologist Howe 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 















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National Park Service auditors Watkins, Thomas and Brekhus arrived 

August 16. Mr. E. W. Watkins is in charge of the group. 

Mr. Robert A. Browne joined the audit group Monday, August 30. 

On August 18, a meeting of the Fisheries Coordinating Committee was 
held at Lake. Investigators on a number of fishery projects report- 
ed their progress and next year's plans were discussed. 

Forester Myers and Supervisory Park Ranger Charles Lamb met with 
forest fire control personnel of the U. S. Forest Service, Region 
One, on the 19th, to discuss operations of the interagency smoke* 
jumper center at West Yellowstone. 

Chief Park Naturalist John M. Good spent the first week of the month 
with the Sierra Club group on a hike to the Mirror Plateau. Mr. Good 
joined the INQUA tour and spent the night 6 of August 16 and 17 with 
the group at Old Faithful Inn. Assistant Chief Park Naturalist G. 
Bryan Harry joined the group the afternoon of the 18th for the trip 
from Canyon to Quake Lake. 

On August 1 and 2, the Assistant Chief Park Naturalist joined the 
Montana Wilderness Society on a trip to Fawn and Bighorn Passes. 

Wage Board Survey . Administrative Officer Anderson and Personnel 
Officer Miller attended the annual planning session for the Co- 
ordinated Wage Survey in Missoula, Montana on August 24 and 25. 
Participants in this planning session included representatives 
from the U. S. Forest Service, Yellowstone, Grand Teton and Glacier 
National Parks, the Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Land Manage- 
ment, Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife Management. Consoli- 
dated Administrative Services (Portland, Oregon), and the Bureau of 
Reclamation which participated for the first time. Two employees, 
representing local employee organisations, will participate in the 
data collecting for the annual wage survey. The data collectors' 
training session is planned for a full day in Billings on September 20. 

Superintendent's Staff meetings were held August 12 and 26. 

Special Visitor . Mr. ThomasL. Kimball, Executive Director of the 
National Wildlife Federation, Washington, D. C, and party visited 
the Park August 14 and 15, on a field trip. They camped at Bridge 
Bay and were escorted by uniformed personnel on a boat trip, fish- 
ing trip, and around the Park sightseeing. The Superintendent 
talked to Mr. Kimball on the 15th. 

Administration 

Payroll for the period ending July 31 amounted to $143,655.08. 
Payroll for the period ending August 14 amounted to $142,425.08. 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYOMING 



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There were 672 on the payroll for the period ending July 31 as 
compared to 695 a year ago. There were 671 on the payroll for the 
period ending August 14, compared to 694 a year ago. 



Personnel 
Promotion 



Reassignment 



Career . 
Conditional 



Frank B. Elliott, promoted to Chief of Park 
Maintenance, GS-13, effective August 1 

William E. Hape, promoted to Foreman IV-Maintenance , 
effective August 15 

Harold E. Appleby reassigned to permanent position 
of Foreman III -Maintenance, effective August 29 

Miss Linda L. Gailbreaith was given a Career Conditional 
appointment to position of Secretary (Stenography) CS-4, 
effective August 15; Secretary to Chief Park Ranger 



Car. Conditional Howard Foresythe, Electrician 
Sub. to Furlough Anton Straiskl, Painter 



Resignation 



Kathryn P. McCleery, Office Services Supervisor, 
effective October 1 



Retirement Ernest R. I. Anderson, Administrative Officer, 
application fof retirement, effective October 1 

Transfers William B. Foster, Foreman IV-Maintenance to 
Everglades National Park, effective August 1 

Louis L. Gunzel, to Chief Park Ranger, 
Saguaro National Monument, effective August 15 

Mrs. Mary T. Shearer, Secretary-Stenographer to 
Crater Lake National Park, effective August 15 

Keith K. Williams, accounting officer, to Western 
Regional Office, effective August 15 

Forestry Technician John N. Reeves was advised by Region, August 2, 
he was being detailed full time to the Regional blister rust 
control program. 

The following positions were abolished by classification action 
taken by the Midwest Regional Office: 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 



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Foreman Ill-Roadways, vacated by LeRoy Wohlbrandt, effective 

April 2 
Foreman I -Maintenance, WS-4742-41, position No. 116, vacated 

by Volney Bahr, effective August 1 
Foreman IV-Maintenance , WS-4 742-89, position No. 155, vacated 

by William B. Foster, effective August 1 
Foreman II-Painter, WS-4102-57, position 100, vice W. Olson 

Board of Survey . The Board of Survey recommended the destruction, 
by Park forces, of several old frame buildings. The Board of Survey 
was submitted to Buildings No. 304, 305, 306 and 307, total value 
$10,000, were removed from fixed assets per Report of Survey 43-22. 

Kecreat ion/Conservat ion St icker . Accounting Technician E. N. 
Chamberlin, to date, sold Conservation stickers to 15 Yellowstone 
employees and one W0DC employee; seven employees already had purchased 
stickers. 

Old Mammoth Hospital . The demolition of the old Mammoth Hospital 
was started the week of August 16. Contractor is George E. Grover & 
Sons of Shelley, Idaho; $26,657.00. 

The Army started construction of this concrete hospital building 
in 1909 and completed it October 28, 1911. Capacity was 18-men. 
The annex added in 1912 replaced frame provisional (1893) hospital 
north of the Chapel (razed about six years ago). Cost: $66,900.86. 
This building was used by the Army until late in 1918 - then abandoned 
until 1924, when it was reopened, after renovation, on June 15. 
Or. George A. Windsor operated the hospital and employed a dentist, 
Dr. Charles L. Walters, that season. Use by Dr. Windsor and his 
successors continued to the time the new Lake hospital was put in 
use, June 1963. 

Deaths . John C. Gynn, age 55, forester, passed away August 5, 1965 
in the Memorial Hospital, Livingston, Montana, following an illness 
of a month from cancer. Mr. Gynn had been hospitalized since 
July 4. Committal services were conducted August 9 at 2:00 p.m., 
at the Park View Memorial Gardens, Livingston. Memorial Services 
were held August 9 at 8:00 p.m. in the Yellowstone National Park 
Chapel. The Rev. John Lee was in charge. Mr. Gynn had approximately 
33 years of government service. 

James Harvey Bryant, 44, of 2811 South Osage, Amarillo, Texas, passed 
away at Lake Hospital, August 20. Cause of death: Coronary 
Occlusion. Removal to Llano Cemetery, Amarillo, Potter, Texas. 
A visitor. 

Miscellaneous . A Farewell Coffee was held August 5 for Louis L. 
Gunzel, who transferred to Saguaro National Monument, and 

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 



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Mrs. Mary T. Shearer, who transferred to Crater Lake National Park, 

A Farewell Coffee was held In the Coffee Room, August 12 for 
Keith K. Williams who transferred to the Western Regional Office, 
San Francisco. 

Terry Gillett attended Boys State held during the week of August 14 
at Western Montana College, Dillon, Montana. Sponsored by the 
American Legion Post, Gardiner, Montana. 

Special efforts were made by the Park and Concessioners to clean up 
activities on August 1 in cooperation with Secretary Udell's call 
for an all-out cleanup campaign on that day. 

Yellowstone Park School opened its doors August 31 at 9:00 a.m., 
with 50 children registered. 

Conservation, Interpretation and Use 

Research and Observation . On August 2, seasonal naturalist William 
C. Scott observed two adult and two young otters in the rapids of 
the Yellowstone River five miles above Gardiner, Montana. At the 
time he was attempting to land a three pound German Brown trout which 
ha had hooked and which one of the otters was trying to catch! 
Needless to say, trying to land a three pound trout, ward off the 
invading thief and take pictures of the show proved to be quite a 
feet; however, Mr. Scott was the winner and Mr. °tter the loser in 
the battle. 

Park Naturalist Mary Meagher spent most of the month on various aspects 
of the bison study, with one helicopter flight made to check animal 
location. 

Neckbands on the Lamar animals are not proving durable enough and 
more than half have been lost. In contrast, the Hayden Valley 
neckbands seem to be holding up well. Difference in wear is attrib- 
uted to the difference in type of forest areas used by the animals 
rather than to behavior differences. 

The four goslings which were hatched on a small island in Hot Lake 
on May 14 successfully survived the summer. By August 1, they had 
the appearance of adult honkers; about August 14 the family moved to 
part 8 unknown. The temperature of the water in Hot Lake where the 
Firehole Lake drainage enters is 162 degrees F. At the outlet of 
Hot Lake the temperature is 104 degrees F. 

About 3:00 p.m. on August 2, a new geyser erupted in the lower basin 
of Potts Hot Springs. The Initial eruption threw hot water, sinter 
and gravel in all directions with much of the debris landing on the 
road. Two additional eruptions occurred during the month. The new 

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geyser is rather interesting as it erupts from one end of a cool 
pond in which yellow pond lillies and other aquatic vegetation grow. 

STEAMBOAT GEYSER began a major eruption at 12:15 a.m., just fifty 
days since the last major eruption. There was a 10 minute water 
phase on the North Vent , a 60 minute water phase on the South Vent 
and a steam phase of about 14 hours. The prior eruption was 
July 10 at 9:30 p.m. 

In September 1964, the temperature of EMERALD POOL was 147 degrees; 
by August of this year the temperature had risen to 156 degrees, 
which has resulted in restoration of the deep green which has char- 
acterised this spring during most of its known history. 

The water in GREEK SPRING in Black Sand Basin has been about ten 
inches below overflow all season due to the heavy runoff from Rain- 
bow Pool. Nearby CLIFF GEYSER has erupted about once a day. 

Water in the craters of the THREE SISTERS has stood 2 to 3 inches 
below overflow all season; this increase in hydrostatic pressure, 
plus overflow of two nearby springs, has resulted in suppression 
of all geyser activity in Three Sisters. 

Activity of SPITEFUL GEYSER which began in late July continued 
throughout all of August, with two-minute eruptions occurring about 
every 13 minutes . 

During August LION GEYSER had four active phases lasting about 
48 hours, with eruptions occurring about every one to two hours. 

There were no known pauses in the activity of CLEPSYDRA GEYSER 
during the month; its activity has resulted in the dormancy of 
Fountain and Morning. 

The major geysers in the Upper Basin erupted on the following 
pattern schedule during the month: 



GRAND 



Maximum interval 10 hrs.-45 tains 
Minimum interval 7 hrs.-50 mins 
Average interval 9-10 hours 



RIVERSIDE 



CASTLE 



Maximum interval 
Minimum interval 
Average interval 

Maximum interval 
Minimum interval 
Average interval 



7 hours. -35 mins, 

5 hr8.-53 mins. 

6 hrs.-6 mins. 

9 hours. -4 mins. 

8 hrs.-5 mins. 
8 hrs.-25 mins. 



YELLOWSTONE NA1 PARK. 



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OLD FAITHFUL 355 eruptions 

Maximum interval 94 minutes (8/25/65) 
Minimum interval 36 minutes ( " ) 
Average interval 66.4 minutes 

Interpretive Services . West District interpretation reached its 
peak during August regarding both services offered and visitors 
attending. In spite of the cool and rainy weather toward the end 
of the month, audiences remained relatively large. The number of 
visitors did not fall off as much as was expected during the last 
week of the month. Some on-site stations regretfully had to be 
abandoned, due to departure of some seasonal personnel. 

By late August , seasonal personnel were leaving the Park for their 
winter jobs, and it was necessary to cut back on the variety of 
interpretive services offered. 

YLMA . Both the Fountain Paint Pot leaflet and the Upper Basin Trail 
Guide have sold rapidly. The original shipment of 50,000 Trail 
Guides will probably be exhausted in September; the Paint Pot leaf- 
let supply may last until the end of the visitor season. 

A second printing of Trail Guide to the Siege Area (Big Hole) is 
underway. As of August 23, 3769 copies of the first printing of 
5000 had been disposed of and $189.88 taken in receipts. When the 
entire stock of the first 5000 is sold, receipts will be in the 
neighborhood of $260 which represents a $57 profit on the printing 
investment of $203. The reprint order was placed for 7500 copies 
and the reprinting should be considerably cheaper on a unit cost 
basis than the original order. 

Exhibit and Museum Maintenance . The Old Faithful Visitor Center 
renovation was completed on August 6; the Madison and Norris 
buildings were also fixed and electric lights installed, which will 
greatly enhance the visitors' enjoyment of the facilities. The 
cottage adjacent to the Madison Visitor Center was removed. Inter- 
preters' materials and sales stock are stored in the maintenance 
building. 

Roadside exhibits were cleaned and some touchup maintenance work 
was done during the month. 

Roads and Trails . The Bridge Bay trail project is about 80% complete 

The crusher crew completed operations for the season on August 13 
and this crew has been working on the road drainage in the vicinity 
of the North Entrance. 



10 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 



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Other work undertaken includes guardrail replacement on the East 
Entrance road, rehabilitation of protective fencing around the 
Mt . Washburn propane tanks, construction of protective fencing at 
Steamboat Geyser, and relocation of the trail from the Horris Museum 
parking area to Steamboat Geyser. 

Buildings and Utilities . Reconstruction of the infiltration lines 
and the construction of a 2600 gallon concrete reservoir at Lamar 
was completed during the month. A soil-cement cover was placed 
over the spring area to prevent surface water contamination of the 
springs and thereby complying with Public Health Service standards. 

The new service lines and well pump were installed during the month 
at Northeast Entrance. Included with this work was the installation 
of a 4 M fire hydrant in the housing area. A pump house will be 
constructed next month to complete the new system. 

The major portion of Mammoth Visitor Center rehabilitation project 
was completed during the month. 

The major portion of building 36 (Administrati n Building) was re- 
painted, and the first coat was applied to all the homes in the 
power house area. This project is scheduled for completion in 
October. 

The manholes on the water reservoirs at Mammoth, Stevens Creek and 
Apollinaris Springs have been raised and covered, as recommended 
by the Public Health Service. A new water pump has been installed 
at Duck Lake for the West Thumb water supply. 

The comfort stations in the Old Faithful campground were repainted. 

The interior of the Sign Shop and the Electric Shop were rehabili- 
tated and repainted. 

The Sign Shop made and painted 153 signs during the month, of which 
90% have been placed. 

Sanitation . In general, eating establishments have been rated higher 
this year than last. Accommodations are sub-standard and not only 
need physical improvements, but additional manpower is needed to keep 
these facilities in a state of acceptable cleanliness. 

Follow-up inspections of the Yellowstone Park Company and Hamilton 
Stores food service facilities were made by Public Health Sanitation 
Kenneth Pool on August 27 and 31 in the Mammoth area. All but a few 
of the conditions noted were corrected. 

11 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 



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aWOJJ3Y 



Law Enforcement . A total of 191 law enforcement offenses occurred 
during the month. Of these incidents, 50 were reported under the 
monthly FBI Uniform Crime Report . 

Enforcement and Investigation . During August , 126 appearance bonds 
were posted. Twenty-three court hearings were scheduled and pre- 
sented before the U. S. Commissioner 

Safety and Health . A total of 56 motor vehicle accidents occurred 
during August. Of these 36 incurred damages under $100; 9 incurred 
damages of $100 or more; and 11 caused personal injuries. 

On August 12, two separate head-on collisions hospitalized a total 
of 13 persons. One accident, involving a government vehicle driven 
by William Rape, an employee, occurred just north of Madison Junction 
near Terrace Spring. The mishap was caused by a visitor car getting 
out of the driver's control. The other accident took place east of 
Norris Junction on the Norris-Canyon road and involved two visitors' 
cars. 

On August 17, the motor vehicle accident in which Mr. Frank Dale 
Ostwald of Billings, Montana was involved, was apparently an 
attempted suicide. According to the doctors at the lake Hospital, 
Mr. Ostwald said he had attempted to take his life by running his 
car off the road, and he had also stabbed himself in the chest with 
his radio antenna. Mr. Ostwald* s mother stated that her son was 
mentally disturbed and had been under psychiatric care. He is 
recovering in a Billings, Montana hospital. 

Campgrounds . Campgrounds were filled from the first of the month 
through the 22. After that date various campgrounds were filled 
but not all throughout the Park. 

Forest Fire Protection . Fire Control Specialist Gunzel and Park 
Forester Myers inspected a new forest fire lookout on the Squaw 
Creek District of the Gallatin National Forest on the 3rd, to 
determine if the design and construction will meet our needs for 
lookout towers being programmed for replacement. 

Insect and Tree Diseases . Hand eradication work in the West Thumb 
unit was completed August 24. The work program for the Duck Lake 
area near West Thumb was approved on the 24th and work was started 
August 26. 

Eradication work continues in the Obsidian Cliff area. It is 
estimated 25 more man days are needed to complete the area. 

12 

„, o<\»K WYOMING 
£LU OWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. 



YE 



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White Pine Blister Rust . Forestry Technician Reeves and a 5-man 
blister rust control Survey crew made a pine-ribes distribution and 
disease survey in Bryce Canyon National Park and Cedar Brakes 
National Monument the week of August 9-16 at the request of the Mid- 
west and Southwest Regions. The purpose is to determine if the 
White Pine blister rust disease cronartium ribicola is present and 
the probable potential for inception, intensification and spread of 
the disease. 

Concessioners . The following accommodations and services closed 
during the month: 

August 23 - Lake Lodge Curio Shop 
August 28 - Mammoth Cabins 

- Roosevelt Lodge, food and stagecoach rides (after breakfast) 

- Roosevelt Lodge, Saddle Horses 

- Mt. Washburn Trips 

- Last day to depart from Park on a tour, through the 
East and Northeast Entrance 

August 29 - Tower Junction Service Station, cob 

The Old Faithful Lodge "River Row" cabins were razed during the 
month . 

Wildlife and Fish Cultural Activities . Work was begun on the 1965-66 
wildlife management plan, near the end of the month. 

BEAR . Mr. Kenneth Pierce, Geologist for the U. S. Geological Survey, 
reported observing 12 gristzly bear in the area around Fawn 
Pass during the early part of the month. One sow had four 
yearling cubs with her. 

Mr. Pierce also observed a large black bear drive a mother 
grizzly and two cubs from one of the elk carcasses killed 
for study purposes. 

Bear Statistics 



Roadside-Public Use Area Trend Count 



Date 



August 7 



Distribution 

North 
South 
West 



Number of Bears 



1965 

9 
27 
22 

■■■■■•' 

5? 



1964 

17 

17 

JL 

42 



1963 

21 

14 
15 
50 



13 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 



! , 

- 

! 







































"10TSWC 



Date 


14 


Distribution 


August 


North 
South 






West 


August 


21 


North 
South 
West 


August 


28 


North 
South 
West 



1965 



Number of Bears 



13 1/ 

24 

-11/ 

42 ' 

11 1/ 
I Jf 



8 1/ 

20 " 
22 

50 



1964 

4 
13 
14 
31 

10 
14 
11 
35 

11 

6 
3 

20 



1963 

17 

7 
18 
42 

13 
25 
22 
60 

13 
11 
21 

45 



1/ Mammoth not reporting 

2/ Old Faithful not reporting 

3/ Lake not reporting 



Bear Injuries 

Bear Damages 

Bears killed: 
for control 
by accident 

Bears shipped to zoos 



Bear Incidents through August 
22 28 27 



250 





r. 



152 



177 



7 
13 



5 



2 



ELK Cooperative elk management general plans for the 1965-66 winter 
have been tentatively agreed upon by the National Park Service 
and the Montana Fish and Came Department, Bozeman, 

Public Affairs 

Publicity . On each Thursday the Yellowstone Weekly News was issued 
to keep employees, concessioners, and others currently informed of 
Park happenings. 

Religious and Chapel Use . Services for all religious faiths were 
conducted throughout the Park during the month of August. 

Public Relations . On August 6, KID-TV, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, aired 
the "America" travelogue program. The program featured scenery in 
the Rocky Mountain West and included Harold Young's snowmobile trip 
from West Yellowstone to the Old Faithful area during the winter. 

14 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 









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MA 3'/10TaWOJJ3^ 



Contract s 

Morell Construction Company $65,051.50 
West Yellowstone, Montana 



Annco Steel Corp. $ 3,139.08 

Billings, Montana 

Big Hole National Battlefield . 



Construction of Utility 
Extensions, NPS area 
West Yellowstone 

Culverts and related 
items 



Travel . The visitation for the month showed a decrease of 5% 
per cent when compared with the same period last year (5,970 persons 
this August agsinst 6,302 in 1964). The cumulative total for the 
year continued to fall behind- -down 594 persons as compared with 
the figure for the same date last year. The decrease appears to 
have resulted from the dampering effect of bad weather. 

Interpretive Facilities . A complete renovation of the museum was 
effected by Mrs. Jean Swearingen August 7-10. The i*new look" was 
well-received by the visitors. 

The Chief of Maintenance, Frank B. Elliott, accompanied by Assistant 
Superintendent Carpenter, inspected maintenance and construction 
activities at the Battlefield August 2 and 3. 



15 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 









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17 






Stop Order ww t aawri «£ftctiv« AMg»9t 3*» J#£S* «&s* to vet Wtttitt . 

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In triplicate 



cc: kegionai Director, Midwest 
Mgnt .Assistant 
Library 



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Louis L. Gunzel, Forester (Fire Control) receiving gift certi- 
ficate for Scotty Chapman painting from Chief Park Ranger 
Wayne R. Howe at Farewell Coffee, August 5, 1965. Les Gunzel 
transferred to Saguaro National Monument, Tucson, Arizona as 
Chief Park Ranger effective August 15. NPS PHOTO 




Mrs. Mary T. Shearer, Secretary-Stenographer to Chief Park 
Ranger Wayne R. Howe, receiving gift certificate for a Scotty 
Chapman painting from the Chief, at Farewell Coffee held 
August 5, 1965. Mary transferred to Crater Lake National 
Park, Oregon as Secretary to the Superintendent effective 
August 15. NPS PHOTO 



YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. WYOMING 





Keith K. Williams, Accounting Officer, and Mrs. Williams at 
Farewell Coffee August 12, 1965. The Tower Fall pain;: 
by Scotty Chapman shown in the photograph is a gift to 
Mr. and Mrs. Williams. Keith and his family came to Yellow- 
stone in April 1964 and transferred to San Francisco where 
he will be Operating Accountant in the Western Regional 
Office, effective August 15. NPS PHOTO 



Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming